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Introduction

The EU operates through a hybrid system of supranational independent institutions and intergovernmental decisions negotiated by the member states. The general political direction and priorities of the EU are defined by the European Council, though it lacks the power to pass laws. Decision-making procedures of the EU involve three main institutions: the European Parliament, which represents and is directly elected by EU citizens; the Council of the European Union, which represents individual member states; and the European Commission, which seeks to uphold the interests of the EU as a whole. 

The EU has developed a single market through a standardized system of laws which apply in all member states. It ensures the free movement of people, goods, services, and capital; enacts legislation in justice and home affairs; and maintains common policies on various domains, including energy efficiency.

Standards are developed through the Ecodesign Implementing Measures, which prioritize product categories for preparatory studies and consultations before a measure is adopted. The EU Energy Label is a mandatory comparative label that rates products by energy efficiency class from A to G on the label, with A representing the most energy efficient and G the least efficient. Recently, additional grades were added to the top of the efficiency scale for products where successful market transformation programs have contributed to widespread improvements in efficiency. 

Introduction

The EU operates through a hybrid system of supranational independent institutions and intergovernmental decisions negotiated by the member states. The general political direction and priorities of the EU are defined by the European Council, though it lacks the power to pass laws. Decision-making procedures of the EU involve three main institutions: the European Parliament, which represents and is directly elected by EU citizens; the Council of the European Union, which represents individual member states; and the European Commission, which seeks to uphold the interests of the EU as a whole. 

The EU has developed a single market through a standardized system of laws which apply in all member states. It ensures the free movement of people, goods, services, and capital; enacts legislation in justice and home affairs; and maintains common policies on various domains, including energy efficiency.

Standards are developed through the Ecodesign Implementing Measures, which prioritize product categories for preparatory studies and consultations before a measure is adopted. The EU Energy Label is a mandatory comparative label that rates products by energy efficiency class from A to G on the label, with A representing the most energy efficient and G the least efficient. Recently, additional grades were added to the top of the efficiency scale for products where successful market transformation programs have contributed to widespread improvements in efficiency. 

Introduction

The EU operates through a hybrid system of supranational independent institutions and intergovernmental decisions negotiated by the member states. The general political direction and priorities of the EU are defined by the European Council, though it lacks the power to pass laws. Decision-making procedures of the EU involve three main institutions: the European Parliament, which represents and is directly elected by EU citizens; the Council of the European Union, which represents individual member states; and the European Commission, which seeks to uphold the interests of the EU as a whole. 

The EU has developed a single market through a standardized system of laws which apply in all member states. It ensures the free movement of people, goods, services, and capital; enacts legislation in justice and home affairs; and maintains common policies on various domains, including energy efficiency.

Standards are developed through the Ecodesign Implementing Measures, which prioritize product categories for preparatory studies and consultations before a measure is adopted. The EU Energy Label is a mandatory comparative label that rates products by energy efficiency class from A to G on the label, with A representing the most energy efficient and G the least efficient. Recently, additional grades were added to the top of the efficiency scale for products where successful market transformation programs have contributed to widespread improvements in efficiency. 

Introduction

The EU operates through a hybrid system of supranational independent institutions and intergovernmental decisions negotiated by the member states. The general political direction and priorities of the EU are defined by the European Council, though it lacks the power to pass laws. Decision-making procedures of the EU involve three main institutions: the European Parliament, which represents and is directly elected by EU citizens; the Council of the European Union, which represents individual member states; and the European Commission, which seeks to uphold the interests of the EU as a whole. 

The EU has developed a single market through a standardized system of laws which apply in all member states. It ensures the free movement of people, goods, services, and capital; enacts legislation in justice and home affairs; and maintains common policies on various domains, including energy efficiency.

Standards are developed through the Ecodesign Implementing Measures, which prioritize product categories for preparatory studies and consultations before a measure is adopted. The EU Energy Label is a mandatory comparative label that rates products by energy efficiency class from A to G on the label, with A representing the most energy efficient and G the least efficient. Recently, additional grades were added to the top of the efficiency scale for products where successful market transformation programs have contributed to widespread improvements in efficiency.